Paper? Papyrus? Papyrus Paper?

Paper? Papyrus? Papyrus paper?

The term “paper” itself comes from the word “papyrus”, which is the plant that the Ancient Egyptians processed to write on. However, papyrus isn’t actually paper. The Egyptians sliced the stem of the papyrus plant into thin strips and pasted them together until they formed something that looked like scrolls and sheets. This is not how you create paper today.

papyrusmaking

From Goopy to Sheets

To actually make paper, you need fibres. Fibres can be from various tree barks, cotton, and many other natural sources.  The fibres are then soaked and mashed into a goopy mold, the mold is then pounded into really thin sheets, and finally hung or laid out to dry.

Paper > Bamboo + Silk

The invention of paper is credited to a man named Ts’ai Lun, a Chinese official back in 105 A.D. During this time, China was writing on either silk or bamboo sheets. The issues with this method were that silk took too long to cultivate and process to create the scrolls, and bamboo was heavy to transport. Not only were they problematic, but they were also expensive and hard to come across (just think about the effort in processing, shipping, and handling these raw materials 2,000 years ago). You couldn’t readily call CatPrint and say, “This is the type of stock that I want my books to be printed on.”

chinese bamboo writing

At this time, the growth of literature also created the need for cheaper and readily accessible writing material. Ts’ai Lun invented the first sheets of paper from pounding the wet pulps of the bark of mulberry trees, rags, hemp, and old fish nets and leaving it out to dry for about a day. Now, instead of having to pay heavy prices or waiting for the next shipment of silk and bamboo, you could just make paper. The best thing about this was that it was easily accessible, and just about anyone could do it if they had the time and material!

Paper Today

Despite this process dating to almost 2000 years ago, we are still using this method to create sheets of paper now, just at a more rapid and advanced technological level. Now we have tree farms dedicated to being cut down for the creation of paper. There is  equipment to chip the wood in preparation for it to become pulp. Complex machines are used instead of hand-macerating the pulps into sheets. Instead of hanging out the pulps to dry for days, hot rollers quickly dry the pulp into paper in a matter of minutes.

Think of how instant and readily accessible papermaking seemed to be 2000 years ago, yet is now even more instant. CatPrint already has 30+ different types of paper ready for you to choose from, which you can see and feel in our sample booklets. Try out our Instant Quote and order your prints today!

Sample Booklet

Just For Fun

Here’s a fun link on how to make your own paper at home!

http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Paper

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About

CatPrint is a boutique color printing company offering premium short run printing via the internet. When founded in 2004, the company was operated out of the owner's basement. Today, CatPrint has expanded into a cutting-edge web establishment, employing a team of workers with expertise in the fields of graphic design, productions and customer service. We also guarantee the use of the largest and most innovative digital presses available to us. Throughout our development, we strive to remain a customer-conscious organization, always trying to offer the most satisfying printing experience. Remember, our main concern is always you – the customer!

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3 comments on “Paper? Papyrus? Papyrus Paper?
  1. […] was made from previous paper products. If you read our previous posts on the history of paper and how paper is made, you would know that paper is made from fibers. So if you take paper fibers from paper products, […]

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  2. […] that is similar to the creation of brand new paper. If you look back at our previous posts on The History of Paper and Paper, Papyrus, and Parchment, you would know that paper is created from the pulp of fibrous […]

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